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person

Names

  • Theodor Baumgarten
  • Dr. Baumgarten

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Correspondence

  • OJ 6/7, [10] Handwritten letter from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated October 26, 1924

    Schenker names ten universities that should receive complimentary copies of Der Tonwille, explaining that university music departments (Seminare) are more suitable recipients than conservatories and other types of music schools. With 1924 coming to an end, he will resign from UE and shift publication of Der Tonwille to Piper or Drei-Masken Verlag in Munich. The latter have agreed to publish his study of Beethoven's Sonata Op. 106

  • OJ 6/7, [11] Handwritten letter from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated November 6, 1924

    Schenker has received a photographic reproduction of the opening chorus of Bach's St Matthew Passion. — Gives account of delays to the publication of Tonwille 8/9 and 10, blaming Hertzka for being slow to send work to the engraver, and has written to him with a request to dissolve the Tonwille contract with UE. — Refers to a recent review by (Julius) Korngold, and recounts a long story about his piano dealer, Bernhard Kohn.

  • OC 54/3 Typed letter from Theodor Baumgarten to Schenker, dated December 9, 1924

    Schenker’s lawyer, Theodor Baumgarten, advises caution in dealing with Universal Edition over the winding-up of Der Tonwille, and with Drei Masken Verlag over the future of the new venture.

  • OC 54/10 Typed letter from Theodor Baumgarten to Schenker, dated January 15, 1925

    Baumgarten expresses his concerns about Schenker’s negotiations with a new publisher, and cautiously advises that his client might instead wish to reach a peaceful agreement with Universal Edition.

  • OC 54/14 Handwritten postcard from Theodor Baumgarten to Schenker, dated January 23, 1925

    Baumgarten will let Schenker know whether he is able to visit him the following Monday (January 26, 1925), to discuss Drei Masken Verlag's letter of January 20 (OC 54/12).

  • OJ 6/7, [16] Handwritten letter from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated January 24, 1925

    Responding point by point to Violin's previously letter (OJ 14/45, [41]), Schenker congratulates his friend on the success of his recent concert. He writes at length about Hertzka's last efforts to hold onto Der Tonwille, and about successful negotiations with Drei Masken Verlag over its successor, Das Meisterwerk in der Musik. He has now to prepare enough material for a yearbook comprising fifteen gatherings by July 1, so that the volume can be published by Christmas. Finally, he echoes Violin's assessment of Hans Weisse, adding a few disparaging remarks about his character.

  • OJ 8/4, [35] Handwritten postcard from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated February 14, 1925

    Schenker asks Violin urgently to send him the receipt for payment made to Universal Edition (for the copies of Der Tonwille paid for by Max Temming).

  • OJ 6/7, [18] Handwritten letter from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated February 22, 1925

    Schenker thanks Violin for his recent letter (and enclosure), which contains evidence of Hertzka's false calculations of subscriptions to Der Tonwille – this letter in stark contrast to the actions of his pupils Weisse and Brünauer, who had given more support to the publication of Weisse's recently published vocal quartets than to his writings. Leaving Der Tonwille behind, which has earned him little money and caused him much misery, he has written a lengthy study of Bach's solo violin works, which will be published in the first volume of Das Meisterwerk in der Musik, which will include a critique of Ernst Kurth's Grundlagen des linearen Kontrapunkts.

  • OJ 6/7, [19] Handwritten letter from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated April 10, 1925

    Continuing the story of the ongoing financial battle against Hertzka and Universal Edition, Schenker thanks Violin for providing confirmation of the subscriptions paid for by Max Temming, then recounts that, at a meeting with Hertzka and his bookkeeper, the order-book for Der Tonwille had several pages torn out. Schenker is upset that his lawyer Dr. Baumgarten, though an old friend, is not fully supportive of his position and would prefer seek a compromise with Hertzka; this, Schenker feels, would rob him of much of his hard-earned royalties, especially from the Beethoven sonata edition. He now asks Violin to find a contact – outside Hamburg – who would be willing to order nine copies of Tonwille 1, as evidence that this issue is still in demand, despite Hertzka's claims to the contrary. He has attended a performance of Hans Weisse's Sextet, of which he found the variation movement and the trio section of the scherzo to be the most satisfactory parts.

  • OJ 6/7, [21] Handwritten letter from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated May 16, 1925

    Making preparations with his solicitor for the legal action against Universal Edition, Schenker asks Violin to find out whether Max Temming paid for the additional subscriptions to Der Tonwille directly through Albert Gutmann in Vienna, or through the firm of Hofmeister in Leipzig. He is nearing completion of the contents of the first Meisterwerk yearbook and asks Violin whether he has yet made summer plans and whether these might include a trip to Galtür.

  • OJ 6/7, [22] Handwritten letter from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated May 30, 1925

    Schenker thanks Violin for his latest efforts to account for subscriptions to Der Tonwille. He sends him the smaller version of the bronze medallion designed by Alfred Rothberger.

  • OJ 8/4, [38] Handwritten postcard from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated June 22, 1925

    Schenker thanks Violin for his most recent efforts concerning the subscriptions to Der Tonwille; he is astonished to learn that Tonwille 10, published in January 1925, did not reach some subscribers until June. He hopes that Violin will be able to visit him in the Tyrol this summer, as he is expecting Vrieslander with his son.

  • OJ 6/7, [23] Handwritten letter from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated July 26, 1925

    Two weeks after arriving in Galtür for the summer holidays, Schenker reports that he has caught up on his sleep and has already dictated an essay on Reger's Variations and Fugue on a Theme of J. S. Bach, Op. 81. He will not allow the legal wrangle with Universal Edition to interfere with his holiday, but he is annoyed about not having been paid by Drei Masken Verlag for the manuscript of Meisterwerk 1. He has responded to a critique of his Erläuterungsausgabe of Op. 110, in an essay in Meisterwerk 1, but will not pursue other attacks upon his work and those of his pupils. The Schenker medallion designed by Alfred Rothberger is going to a second impression; but the mezzotint portrait by Viktor Hammer, which Jeanette finds a superior work, has not yet been printed. Throughout the letter, Schenker urges Violin to bring his family to Galtür sometime during the summer.

  • OJ 6/7, [24] Handwritten letter from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated August 15, 1925

    After expressing his sympathy for Violin, in response to his friend's depressing postcard, Schenker gives an account of some of the summer events, including a visit from Vrieslander and Hoboken and work on two essays for Meisterwerk 2. While continuing to rail against Hertzka and Universal Edition, he repeats the story of Drei Masken Verlag failing to send him 250 Marks upon receipt of the manuscript of Meisterwerk 1. His brother Moses is, however, acquainted with the principal owner of Drei Masken, Felix Sobotka, and through this connection the payment has been made.

  • OJ 6/7, [25] Handwritten letter from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated October 25, 1925

    In this wide-ranging letter, Schenker commiserates with Violin about the high cost of living, and his inability to raise his fees to keep up with it (in particular, he feels unable to ask the wealthy Hoboken to pay more than his other pupils). He reports on sales of a medallion bearing his image, and the imminent arrival of a mezzotint of his portrait, made by Viktor Hammer, of which his brother Moses Schenker has bought the original drawing. Vrieslander will write an essay about his work in Die Musik, accompanied by the portrait, and things are now going well with the corrections to Meisterwerk 1 and the writing of Meisterwerk 2.

  • OJ 8/4, [40] Handwritten postcard from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated December 21, 1925

    Interrupting his correcting of the proofs for the first Meisterwerk Yearbook, Schenker sends Christmas greetings to the Violins, and informs his friend that an out-of-court settlement was made with Universal Edition. Recent concert appearances of the cellist Buxbaum and the violinist van der Berg give him reason to believe that their trio concerts with Violin will be successful. He has arranged for Hammer’s portrait of him to be sent to Hamburg.

  • OC 52/907 Typed letter from Hugo Winter (UE) to Schenker, dated July 14, 1926

    UE have mailed Schenker's statement of account to Galtür.

  • OJ 6/7, [41] Handwritten letter from Schenker to Moriz Violin, dated February 27, 1929

    Schenker thanks Violin for his concerns, describes how they survived the cold weather earlier in February, reports that his monograph on the "Eroica" Symphony is finished and that he has written an article about the Photogram Archive, which has acquired over seven thousand pages of manuscripts. He looks forward to seeing his friend in the summer.

Diaries